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Size Chart

Women
  • INT XXS XS S M L XL
    Chest
    (cm)
    74
    to
    77
    78
    to
    81
    82
    to
    85
    86
    to
    89
    90
    to
    93
    94
    to
    97
    Waist
    (cm)
    59
    to
    62
    63
    to
    66
    67
    to
    70
    71
    to
    74
    75
    to
    78
    79
    to
    82
    Hip
    (cm)
    83
    to
    86
    87
    to
    90
    91
    to
    94
    95
    to
    98
    99
    to
    102
    103
    to
    107
  • INT XXS XS S M L XL
    GER 32 34 36 38 40 42
    US 0-2 4 6 8 10 12
    UK 6 8 10 12 14 16
    ITA 38 40 42 44 46 48
    FRA 34 36 38 40 42 44
    JAP 5 7 9 11 13 15
Men
  • INT XS S M L XL XXL
    Chest
    (cm)
    86
    to
    89
    90
    to
    93
    94
    to
    97
    98
    to
    101
    102
    to
    105
    106
    to
    109
    Waist
    (cm)
    73
    to
    76
    77
    to
    80
    81
    to
    84
    85
    to
    88
    89
    to
    92
    93
    to
    96
    Hip
    (cm)
    87
    to
    90
    91
    to
    94
    95
    to
    98
    99
    to
    102
    103
    to
    106
    107
    to
    109
  • INT XS S M L XL XXL
    GER 44 46 48 50 52 54
    US 34 36 38 40 42 44
    UK 34 36 38 40 42 44
    ITA 44 46 48 50 52 54
    FRA 38 40 42 44 46 48
    JAP 1 2 3 4 5 6
  • CM 72 77 82 87 92
    INCH 28 30 32 34 36

    (Approximate values)

A day in Rotterdam

with

Lex Pott

Creativity may be in Lex Pott’s blood, but his passion for designing products and furniture that enhance our homes is built, above all, on hard work. From mirrors to candles, the product designer’s work is characterised by experimentation, failure and a bit of naivety. Over the years, Lex Pott has created his own colourful interior world, which is exported from Rotterdam around the world. We talked with him about his own brand, his relationship with colours and immediately fell in love with his Rotterdam studio.

The
Interview

Your father was a painter and your mother a sculptor. What was it like growing up in such an art-loving family?

I learned a lot and had an inspiring childhood. I grew up in the world of art, knowing all sorts of things about art history and contemporary art. But to be honest, the downside of the art world is that it’s very tough to make a living. It’s not as romantic as everybody always envisions it. That made me decide to go for a career in applied arts.

You studied Applied Arts at Design Academy Eindhoven. Did you know right from the beginning that you wanted to start your own business after graduating?

Not at all. To be honest, I was never a motivated student at high school. I was more focused on my hobbies, like skating, skateboarding and listening to music. Then somebody suggested I had a look at the graduation show of the Design Academy, and it opened my mind. There was huge diversity and great variety. I didn’t really understand what the courses were about, but I thought, “Wow, if you can study this, that’s fantastic.” You can basically create your own signature and your own DNA there. And to be honest, it combines the best of both worlds for me because, with the word applied, it implies that it has a certain functionality or a utilitarian aspect to it. But at the same time it’s art, so there’s a lot of creativity and artistic freedom. I can also make a good living from the work that I do.

Which part of having your own brand and studio do you enjoy the most?

Although I only do it for a few hours a month, I would say the most enjoyable thing is self-initiated work or total freedom. There’s no commission. There’s no deadline. There’s no one questioning my work – just something that I really believe in and want to make. It’s the most satisfying thing that can happen because it literally starts with: what do I want to do? And what would I want in my own house?

What’s the process of creating your designs, from start to finish?

When we do something in-house, I have an idea and I want to prototype it and visualise it. It usually takes a matter of months because you need exploration. You need experimentation. Failure is crucial. Everybody always thinks everything goes well. But failure is essential. In a few months or even weeks, I can do everything from A to Z – from the first idea or the first spark of inspiration to the prototype. But when I work on commissions or for industry, the minimum is usually a year.

The materials you use in your designs include wood, stone, metal and wax. How do you get the knowledge you need to understand the material and its properties so that you can create something out of it?

It takes a lot of exploration and experimentation, but I must say that I think it’s a great advantage for a designer to be naive. It gives you the freedom to go beyond, to go out of the comfort zone, to do things that haven’t been done before. I have realised that the more you know about a topic, the more things you eliminate because you think they’re too expensive or too difficult. There are lots of reasons not to do them. Naivety is a good catalyst for doing things and exploring things. You can always compromise at the end.

Many of your designs stand out because of their vibrant colours. Do you choose colours by feel, or do you look for specific colour combinations?

The topic of colour is fascinating. I work with it a lot, and I have also realised that clients and other people associate me with it. It’s always the relationship between colours, the narrative, the type of object. All these things together make colour an important part of my work’s DNA

How do you cope with being uninspired and how do you manage to keep reinventing yourself?

I think the cliché about inspiration is that everybody thinks you sit down on a bench, have a magical experience and then it’s there. But I think inspiration is working really hard, trying to study, trying to dive into a subject or a topic and understanding something. For me, inspiration lies more in observation in terms of routines. When I see the same thing every day, when I drive the same route every day, it’s just a matter of perspective. Once your perspective changes, you zoom in on certain things, look closer, look better. And for me, that’s a source of inspiration.

With ten years of experience, are there any milestones you still dream of reaching?

My ultimate dream would be, maybe in five or ten years, to be as independent and free as possible, to have a sustainable business that only comes from my personal fascinations and my personal ideas. I don’t think that is an easy milestone, but I’m getting there. Step by step, it’s getting closer. To add even more flavour to the milestone, I really hope to work in a remote location, almost in the countryside, to have a home that’s a bit isolated with a workshop.

Some artists draw creativity from their dreams. Have you ever had a dream that influenced your work?

When I’m too engrossed in a project, like when I’m literally working day and night, I dream about it. It really becomes part of my DNA. And I also relate it to, well, colours and materials. I like to see those materials or colour palettes. So that could also be part of a dream. I don’t dream that often, but usually my dreams are related to intensity. It literally takes up my mind as well, even when I’m sleeping. I also have two little children. One is two, and the other one is four years old. And I think they have a much wilder, active imagination when it comes to dreaming because, maybe twice or three times a week, they wake up, and they tell me their dream.

Having your own business is probably also exhausting. How do you balance work and life?

I’m quite disciplined in terms of running my own business. It has taught me a few important lessons. For me, overtime doesn’t make you more productive. Some people work 24/7, but in my opinion it’s better to work from 9.00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. and be as energetic and as efficient as you can within that timeframe. For me, overtime doesn’t work because your productivity goes down. The next day, your battery is half empty, and it gets worse. Indeed, it could ultimately result in burnout. I mean, I love my job, but I also have a private life.

As a designer, you’re sure to be as style-conscious as your own designs and furniture. How would you describe your approach to designing a home?

I believe that an interior should reflect your life, who you are, where your fascinations lie, and things you have collected from different places and at different moments from your childhood to now. I really believe in the organic growth of an interior – like adding things, removing things. And the more personal it gets, the more eclectic it gets in terms of authenticity and mixing styles, the better an interior becomes.

Which things immediately make your home cosier and more unique?

A ton of cushions and blankets. I also have a fireplace in my house. I think the fireplace is one of those beautiful analogue things that calm my mind. We all look at screens a lot – phones, computers – and a fire is sort of the ancient, analogue version of looking at something and feeling calmer.

You moved from Amsterdam to Rotterdam. Why did you choose Rotterdam and, when it comes to living in the city, what is the most enjoyable part?

Rotterdam is a more industrial, raw city. There are a lot of places for experimentation and there’s a huge creative industry in Rotterdam. This eclectic vibe was very appealing to me. Spaces are also much bigger than in Amsterdam. I moved here five or six years ago, and I haven’t regretted it because it fits this moment in time for me very well, where I want to do my own things, live a bit bigger, have a bit more space. The quality of life for me is better in Rotterdam than it used to be in Amsterdam.

Rotterdam has some spectacular architecture to offer. Of all the buildings you have seen, which fascinates you the most?

A new building called the Depot. It’s basically like a big, mirrored pot. It’s an icon of Rotterdam, but it’s also built next to the old, historical museums. The contrast and the beauty are in having those two next to each other. They form a dialogue between the past and the present.

Away from all the well-known spots, what are your five favourite places in Rotterdam – restaurants, shops and cafés?

To celebrate something, I really enjoy Héroine. To see art, I visit the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen. At the weekend, I like to go to the Markthal. For a good steak once in a while, I enjoy the restaurant Loetje, which also has a bar. And Lilith is a nice café in the city centre!

Your father was a painter and your mother a sculptor. What was it like growing up in such an art-loving family?

I learned a lot and had an inspiring childhood. I grew up in the world of art, knowing all sorts of things about art history and contemporary art. But to be honest, the downside of the art world is that it’s very tough to make a living. It’s not as romantic as everybody always envisions it. That made me decide to go for a career in applied arts.

You studied Applied Arts at Design Academy Eindhoven. Did you know right from the beginning that you wanted to start your own business after graduating?

Not at all. To be honest, I was never a motivated student at high school. I was more focused on my hobbies, like skating, skateboarding and listening to music. Then somebody suggested I had a look at the graduation show of the Design Academy, and it opened my mind. There was huge diversity and great variety. I didn’t really understand what the courses were about, but I thought, “Wow, if you can study this, that’s fantastic.” You can basically create your own signature and your own DNA there. And to be honest, it combines the best of both worlds for me because, with the word applied, it implies that it has a certain functionality or a utilitarian aspect to it. But at the same time it’s art, so there’s a lot of creativity and artistic freedom. I can also make a good living from the work that I do.

Which part of having your own brand and studio do you enjoy the most?

Although I only do it for a few hours a month, I would say the most enjoyable thing is self-initiated work or total freedom. There’s no commission. There’s no deadline. There’s no one questioning my work – just something that I really believe in and want to make. It’s the most satisfying thing that can happen because it literally starts with: what do I want to do? And what would I want in my own house?

What’s the process of creating your designs, from start to finish?

When we do something in-house, I have an idea and I want to prototype it and visualise it. It usually takes a matter of months because you need exploration. You need experimentation. Failure is crucial. Everybody always thinks everything goes well. But failure is essential. In a few months or even weeks, I can do everything from A to Z – from the first idea or the first spark of inspiration to the prototype. But when I work on commissions or for industry, the minimum is usually a year.

The materials you use in your designs include wood, stone, metal and wax. How do you get the knowledge you need to understand the material and its properties so that you can create something out of it?

It takes a lot of exploration and experimentation, but I must say that I think it’s a great advantage for a designer to be naive. It gives you the freedom to go beyond, to go out of the comfort zone, to do things that haven’t been done before. I have realised that the more you know about a topic, the more things you eliminate because you think they’re too expensive or too difficult. There are lots of reasons not to do them. Naivety is a good catalyst for doing things and exploring things. You can always compromise at the end.

Many of your designs stand out because of their vibrant colours. Do you choose colours by feel, or do you look for specific colour combinations?

The topic of colour is fascinating. I work with it a lot, and I have also realised that clients and other people associate me with it. It’s always the relationship between colours, the narrative, the type of object. All these things together make colour an important part of my work’s DNA

How do you cope with being uninspired and how do you manage to keep reinventing yourself?

I think the cliché about inspiration is that everybody thinks you sit down on a bench, have a magical experience and then it’s there. But I think inspiration is working really hard, trying to study, trying to dive into a subject or a topic and understanding something. For me, inspiration lies more in observation in terms of routines. When I see the same thing every day, when I drive the same route every day, it’s just a matter of perspective. Once your perspective changes, you zoom in on certain things, look closer, look better. And for me, that’s a source of inspiration.

With ten years of experience, are there any milestones you still dream of reaching?

My ultimate dream would be, maybe in five or ten years, to be as independent and free as possible, to have a sustainable business that only comes from my personal fascinations and my personal ideas. I don’t think that is an easy milestone, but I’m getting there. Step by step, it’s getting closer. To add even more flavour to the milestone, I really hope to work in a remote location, almost in the countryside, to have a home that’s a bit isolated with a workshop.

Some artists draw creativity from their dreams. Have you ever had a dream that influenced your work?

When I’m too engrossed in a project, like when I’m literally working day and night, I dream about it. It really becomes part of my DNA. And I also relate it to, well, colours and materials. I like to see those materials or colour palettes. So that could also be part of a dream. I don’t dream that often, but usually my dreams are related to intensity. It literally takes up my mind as well, even when I’m sleeping. I also have two little children. One is two, and the other one is four years old. And I think they have a much wilder, active imagination when it comes to dreaming because, maybe twice or three times a week, they wake up, and they tell me their dream.

Having your own business is probably also exhausting. How do you balance work and life?

I’m quite disciplined in terms of running my own business. It has taught me a few important lessons. For me, overtime doesn’t make you more productive. Some people work 24/7, but in my opinion it’s better to work from 9.00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. and be as energetic and as efficient as you can within that timeframe. For me, overtime doesn’t work because your productivity goes down. The next day, your battery is half empty, and it gets worse. Indeed, it could ultimately result in burnout. I mean, I love my job, but I also have a private life.

As a designer, you’re sure to be as style-conscious as your own designs and furniture. How would you describe your approach to designing a home?

I believe that an interior should reflect your life, who you are, where your fascinations lie, and things you have collected from different places and at different moments from your childhood to now. I really believe in the organic growth of an interior – like adding things, removing things. And the more personal it gets, the more eclectic it gets in terms of authenticity and mixing styles, the better an interior becomes.

Which things immediately make your home cosier and more unique?

A ton of cushions and blankets. I also have a fireplace in my house. I think the fireplace is one of those beautiful analogue things that calm my mind. We all look at screens a lot – phones, computers – and a fire is sort of the ancient, analogue version of looking at something and feeling calmer.

You moved from Amsterdam to Rotterdam. Why did you choose Rotterdam and, when it comes to living in the city, what is the most enjoyable part?

Rotterdam is a more industrial, raw city. There are a lot of places for experimentation and there’s a huge creative industry in Rotterdam. This eclectic vibe was very appealing to me. Spaces are also much bigger than in Amsterdam. I moved here five or six years ago, and I haven’t regretted it because it fits this moment in time for me very well, where I want to do my own things, live a bit bigger, have a bit more space. The quality of life for me is better in Rotterdam than it used to be in Amsterdam.

Rotterdam has some spectacular architecture to offer. Of all the buildings you have seen, which fascinates you the most?

A new building called the Depot. It’s basically like a big, mirrored pot. It’s an icon of Rotterdam, but it’s also built next to the old, historical museums. The contrast and the beauty are in having those two next to each other. They form a dialogue between the past and the present.

Away from all the well-known spots, what are your five favourite places in Rotterdam – restaurants, shops and cafés?

To celebrate something, I really enjoy Héroine. To see art, I visit the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen. At the weekend, I like to go to the Markthal. For a good steak once in a while, I enjoy the restaurant Loetje, which also has a bar. And Lilith is a nice café in the city centre!

 

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Lex Pott x CLOSED

Lex Pott

Lex Pott

New Worker Shirt

260 ¤

New X-Lent Tapered Jeans

  • Relaxed
250 ¤

New Smooth Nappa Sneaker Low

300 ¤

New Printed Crew Neck

200 ¤

New Stand-Up Collar Shirt with Stripes

180 ¤

New Dover Tapered Pants

  • Relaxed
270 ¤

New A BETTER BLUE Organic Denim Shirt

200 ¤

New Logo Socks

20 ¤

+5 Colours

New Doubleface Jacket

500 ¤

New T-Shirt Twenty Four Seven

80 ¤

New Smooth Nappa Sneaker Low

300 ¤

New Tacoma Tapered Pants

  • Relaxed / 
  • cropped
270 ¤

New Wool & Cotton Sweater Vest

200 ¤

New Logo T-Shirt

130 ¤

+1 Colour

New Striped Socks

20 ¤

+1 Colour

New Dover Tapered Pants

  • Relaxed
230 ¤

+1 Colour

New Organic American Fleece Hoodie

260 ¤

+1 Colour

New Oxford Shirt

140 ¤

+1 Colour

New Oakland Straight Jeans

  • Slim
230 ¤

New Striped Longsleeve

100 ¤