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Size Chart

Women
  • INT XXS XS S M L XL
    Chest
    (cm)
    74
    to
    77
    78
    to
    81
    82
    to
    85
    86
    to
    89
    90
    to
    93
    94
    to
    97
    Waist
    (cm)
    59
    to
    62
    63
    to
    66
    67
    to
    70
    71
    to
    74
    75
    to
    78
    79
    to
    82
    Hip
    (cm)
    83
    to
    86
    87
    to
    90
    91
    to
    94
    95
    to
    98
    99
    to
    102
    103
    to
    107
  • INT XXS XS S M L XL
    GER 32 34 36 38 40 42
    US 0-2 4 6 8 10 12
    UK 6 8 10 12 14 16
    ITA 38 40 42 44 46 48
    FRA 34 36 38 40 42 44
    JAP 5 7 9 11 13 15
Men
  • INT XS S M L XL XXL
    Chest
    (cm)
    86
    to
    89
    90
    to
    93
    94
    to
    97
    98
    to
    101
    102
    to
    105
    106
    to
    109
    Waist
    (cm)
    73
    to
    76
    77
    to
    80
    81
    to
    84
    85
    to
    88
    89
    to
    92
    93
    to
    96
    Hip
    (cm)
    87
    to
    90
    91
    to
    94
    95
    to
    98
    99
    to
    102
    103
    to
    106
    107
    to
    109
  • INT XS S M L XL XXL
    GER 44 46 48 50 52 54
    US 34 36 38 40 42 44
    UK 34 36 38 40 42 44
    ITA 44 46 48 50 52 54
    FRA 38 40 42 44 46 48
    JAP 1 2 3 4 5 6
  • CM 72 77 82 87 92
    INCH 28 30 32 34 36

    (Approximate values)

Issue 1
Autumn 2018

Hard Copy

On
Staying
And
Going

This is the first ever issue of HARD COPY by Closed. Here is a selection of stories about things that move us – created by and with people whom we admire. Selected within the theme ‘Staying and Going’, they represent things that last forever and things that won’t. Some we try to preserve and, then again, others we wish we could get rid of. We are wondering: Will you forget after reading or is this something you might just remember forever?

Gordon Giers

His insane love for details is something that will probably never go away. Luckily. He is the one who makes sure we never compromise on our commitment to quality.

Hans Redlefsen

His biggest wish was for the HSV football club to stay in the first league – unfortunately, and for the first time in the history of the Bundesliga, that was not what happened.

Til Nadler

Most days of the year he travels the world. But, just like a boom­er­­ang, he always comes back to us – usually with fresh insights into what’s new and up-and-coming.

Take A

Look

We asked Ruby Barber, flower stylist and founder of Mary Lennox in Berlin, to draw inspiration from our lookbook. And because there is nothing nicer than being surprised by a bunch of flowers, more bouquets will pop up throughout this paper.

EDIN
Hasanovic

Discreetly
Striking

He is a rising star on the German film scene, Edin Hasanovic attracted the attention of the public in 2012 in the film Shifting the Blame. Four years later he won the Golden Kamera’s award for up-and-coming talent. This year, he presented the German Film Awards together with Iris Berben. Our conversation ranged from good intentions and issues of style to having your own attitude.

A Charming Villain

Edin was born in 1992 at the start of the Bosnian war, in the town of Zvornik on the border with Serbia. A few months later, his mother fled with him to Berlin. As early as 2003, he appeared in the children’s film Second Hand Child. He worked with the Berliner ­Ensemble when he reached 13 and was thereafter often cast in films as a crook, captor, or quick-tempered youth. ­Meanwhile, he has collected a few prizes: he took Best Actor at the TV Crime Festival for his role in Auf kurzer Distanz and Best Young Talent 2013 at the Golden Kamera awards.

When did you notice that something was happening with your career, something was taking off?

It hasn’t happened yet (laughs)!

Hasn’t it? But you have come so far so fast ...

Well, ‘fast’ is not a word I’d use: I am 26 years old and it’s taken 14 years to reach the stage I’m at. I started when I was 12 and it began to develop, little by little.

So little, that you presented the German Film Awards this year! Your welcoming speech was pretty amusing, but also quite political. You said that by inviting you, a refugee was presenting the awards ...

Yes, a little seriousness had to be included.

You fled the Bosnian war with your mother when you were only a toddler. How has that influenced your character and career?

It has certainly heightened my awareness. And also my awareness of others, other refugees, former refugees. That’s why saying something was important to me. No matter whom a society closes itself off from, it denies these people the chance to develop. If the door had been closed to me, I would not be where I am. The fact that I was standing there on the stage was, and is, for me personally, quite huge. And, naturally, if your start in life was difficult, it shapes your character. I escaped the war, and my goal was to be involved in the film industry – it’s not a smooth path.

Is having an attitude important to you for this reason?

Having an attitude is important to me for so many reasons! Not having any backbone, prattling on without having an opinion – that is simply too dull. I would like to live up to my ethical and moral standards.

And what are they?

Whenever I feel that something isn’t right, to open my mouth immediately and say, ‘Hey, stop, I’m not happy with that!’ It starts when we are really young; we laugh out of politeness, even though the joke isn’t funny.

Is attitude also a question of style?

Define ‘style’! I would say not having an attitude, not opening your mouth, that is not having any style. On the other hand, if 25,000 people demonstrate against the ‘Alternative für Deutschland’ party in Berlin, they are showing true style.

How would you describe your inner style?

This is where I see images like fire, powerfulness, speed, being thrilling, electrifying, and – in the broad­est sense – incredibly intense.

Wow! And what is your public style?

Discreetly striking. When I go to public events, I don’t want to stand out like a sore thumb, but equally, I don’t want to look like everyone else. I really love dressing up to look chic. I love suits. But if there’s a dress code, I always try to break it a little – without rocking up dressed completely inappropriately. So on second glance, people should think ‘pretty cool’. That’s what I aspire to (laughs).

Wrapping Up

There’s a lot going on in Edin’s life: in May, the second season of You are Wanted, by and starring Matthias Schweighöfer, began. In passing, Hasanovic presented the German Film Awards in April, and is currently shooting two films: Mariko Minoguchi’s feature film debut and the David Dietl comedy Rate a Date. Afterwards, there is just one thing left on the agenda, says Edin: ‘A holiday, at last!’

Get your own HARD COPY paper instore and read the full story.

TRUST
IN

Fall

See more of our Autumn/Winter campaign here.

Is It
Rubbish –

or can
I chuck it?

Less than five years ago, fashion made from recycled raw materials would have been regarded as a well-intended joke. Individuals such as Pharrell Williams and Will.i.am, who promoted jeans made from PET bottles and luggage from drinks cans, were considered to be ambitious PR movers and shakers.

It takes up to 400 years for plastic to subvert. Only one-third of materials gets recycled. To reuse in fashion seems a logical solution.

Does not look like it is made from rubbish: the Eco­down filling is a free fibre down alter­native that offers the same performance and quality from 100% recycled fibres.

Asked

If anyone knows about good style, it’s Dan May. This charming Brit’s CV reveals what seems to be the dream career in fashion. It includes ten years at 10 magazine and being the founding style director for Mr Porter. Dan created the looks for our autumn 2018 menswear collection – and answered your most frequent questions about upcoming trends.

Ein Beitrag geteilt von mrmay1 (@mrmay1) am

Follow Dan May on Instagram on @mrmay1
it will totally upgrade your feed

and
answered

How do you introduce patterns into your wardrobe?

I think the easiest way to inject a little bit of pattern into your wardrobe is to start with an undergarment, just a shirt, for example. This way you can slowly get more comfortable with the idea and you can decide how much of it you want to show. For example, you can cover it with a jacket or simply put a sweatshirt over it – so you have little elements popping up from below. Also, I think that it is very much about what you feel comfortable doing. This is most important, as otherwise you will be too self-conscious when you go out. So, in conclusion I would say: just start with an undergarment and take it from there!

How do you make a traditionally conservative piece – such as a checked blazer – work?

With something like a classic tweed jacket, it totally makes sense to add some colour or something casual, like a sweatshirt, underneath that gives it a more contemporary edge. You could also wear wide-leg workwear-style trousers with it or choose a more tapered fit with a turn-up, or a roll-up on jeans, which will add the desired modernity to this more traditional look.

When and where should you wear a beanie?

Normally, I would say it is not very appropriate to wear it inside. However, I think it really depends on your surroundings. In New York, for example, everyone wears one inside: in restaurants, shops, everywhere. Nevertheless, for me a beanie is first of all a practical thing – something to keep you warm. More than half of all your body heat leaves through your head, so it makes sense to cover it when it is cold out. However, unlike a cap, I would only wear a beanie outside myself, not inside.

Closed ×
Francois
Girbaud

Combining heritage with modern functionality, a unique collaboration between Closed and its original founder François Girbaud.

– 2nd Edition

Get your own HARD COPY paper instore and read the full story.

Closed always tries to reinvent itself, also when collaborating with its original founder after parting ways almost 30 years ago. At the centre of the 2nd collaboration with François Girbaud – a creative mind that tirelessly creates – are topics of the everyday life in today’s world: Sportswear, Denim and Social Media.

But first it is worth taking a look back: Closed was founded in 1978 by Marithé and François Girbaud. The duo was not only pioneers of European sportswear – forerunners of today’s streetwear – but also committed innovators who set boundaries for modern denim design. François Girbaud was the first designer to use stonewashed denim, a signature style that is now a casual-wear staple. As a vigorous source of ideas, he can’t help but outline his enduringly avant-garde, forthcoming versions of his concept of denim; he is always looking for the next point of perfection and delights in the possibilities of pattern-cutting and fabrics, pushing the very boundaries in order to bring Closed’s vision into the design.

Subsequently, they revolutionised casual wear. They reinvented classic denim fits with the Pedal Pusher – a style that was inspired by postman uniforms in Italy. Further, they went onto refining the laundering treatment of denim. In Girbaud’s view, design should be forward looking and avant garde, reflecting the properties of the materials, and thus functional and innovative.

With the 2nd edition, Closed acknowledges its heritage and presents a capsule wardrobe which plays with intelligent design and a willingness to experiment. François Girbaud and Closed have paired up once again to create a sense of timelessness – for the future.

Argus-
Eyed

Niko
Wessel

He began his career at Closed, and he has spent time in New York and Munich between then and now. Now he’s back. Thanks to Niko Wessel, men’s jeans no longer just fit well, they now sit well – a portrait of a clothing technician.

A yellow measuring tape hangs around Niko Wessel’s neck, standing out against his black shirt. He looks a bit like a tailor. Wessel laughs, “Almost! It is actually my most important work tool. I measure a lot, every day.”

Wessel works in quality assurance at the headquarters of Closed in Hamburg. His area is the men’s collection. And above all it is jeans.

Before a collection is produced, each piece often goes back and forth numerous times between the designer, sewing room, laundry – and, of course, Wessel.

And there are many things that can go wrong along the way. “There are always problems. That’s part of my job and I have to manage all of it so things turn out well.” Sometimes it’s people who are the problem, sometimes it’s about communication, and sometimes it’s about the threads themselves. All this, says Wessel, is completely normal. So, along with six other team members, he controls every detail before an item is finally produced. The biggest focus is on the fit. This, by the way, is something that is not only tested theoretically, but also practically. “We always try on things – we make clothes that must fit well and sit well.” And making jeans, explains Wessel, is a science in itself.

Get your own HARD COPY paper instore and read the full story.

Grand
Design

Small
Details

Opinions, love letters, feedback and criticism are all appreciated under hardcopy@closed.com

See you
soon.

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